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Nvidia's GTX 1080ti Ethereum Reviews

NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 1080 TI Ethereum MINING PERFORMANCE REVIEW


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Warning: We can make money, We use Optimized Affiliate Ebay links that are auto updated daily.

The Nvidia line of high-end gaming GPU’s recently got an upgrade. As expected, their newest model – the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 Ti hit the shelves March 10th at the price of $699 USD. It was well-received in the mining community and the mining performance test results look promising as well.

The GTX 1080 Ti is one of the few top-tier Nvidia GPU models that have GDDR5X memory instead of the more common GDDR5. The GDDR5X standard supports 10Gbit/s data rates, which is reflected on how the miner performs with memory-intensive algorithms.

POWER CONSUMPTION IN WATTAGE

As specs state, the GPU power consumption limit is 250W on non-synthetic operations. The Founders Edition allows users to increase that limit by 20%. This means that the power consumption can be pushed up to 300W, but some additional cooling should be necessary too.

The GPU can be underclocked. There are no solid data about underclocking possibilities just yet, but experienced users stated that the GTX 1080 Ti has some potential.

Note: As for today, March 2017, only the Founders Edition will be available. The non-reference design will be on sale starting in April.

COOLING THE GTX 1080TI

The GTX 1080 Ti comes with only one cooler. While there were no complaints about cooling yet, it is recommended to manually lock the fan speeds to 100% to prevent thermal throttling.

GTX 1080 TI PERFORMANCE 

Due to the GPU structure and memory clock of 11 GHz, the GTX 1080 Ti does not perform equally on all algorithms. For instance, according to some tests, the GPU would not work with BMW and Cryptonight at default intensity, and would only start working after the intensity (along with the hashrate) would be manually lowered.

Other algorithms like Jackpot, Quark and Wildkeccak don’t work with the GPU at all, which might be, or might be not a temporary issue. Those tests were performed using the latest ccMiner fork release as for March 14th.

GeForce-GTX-1080-Ti-NiceHash-Miner-Bechmark.jpg

PROFITABILITY? USING GTX 1080 TI?

According to the first tests, the GPU performs the best with the NiceHash EQM miner with an average hashrate of 620 H/s for ZEC. This results in profits of about 2.20 USD a day, giving the GPU a ROI of 10 months. The miner only works on NiceHash pools though, so that’s a detail to keep in mind.

Experts were also surprised by how poorly the GTX 1080 Ti performed with the Lyra2rev2 algorithm, outputting only 48.5 MH/s using the ccminer. However, this might be fixed with future driver updates in a week or two.

Finally, the GTX 1080 Ti was also tested using the Claymore’s Ethereum miner on stock GPU settings. The results were stable, with a hashrate of 31.8 MH/s. The new EWBF CUDA miner also worked surprisingly well with the card, allowing it to output 625 H/s.